Matt Horne is a full time potter based near Folkestone, Kent.  His hand thrown porcelain ceramics are finished with beautiful crystalline glazes which he has been working with and perfecting the use of since 2009. Matt enjoys experimenting with throwing challenging shapes and glazing with new colour combinations to produce his exciting, contemporary work.


Matt began studying Ceramics at Astor College, Dover for GCSE and A Level. After leaving school, he worked as an apprenticeship for 2 years at an established pottery in Aylesford, Kent to continue my training and eventually started making pots for their shop.  During his apprenticeship he learnt lots of different techniques including production throwing using stoneware clay, turning, glazing and different firings.

In 2008 Matt set up his own ceramics studio near Folkestone, Kent, initially producing decorative domestic ware; from 2009 he has concentrated on working with porcelain and the crystalline glazes he had discovered a passion for during his training, experimenting with new, contemporary shaped vases and testing new glazes, always trying to produce more exciting colour combinations.


Matt Horne - MT002

Blue Cylinder Vase

Porcelain with Crystalline Glaze

Matt Horne - MHO003

Yellow Cylinder Vase

Porcelain with Crystalline Glaze

Matt Horne - MHO004

Yellow Long Necked Vase

Porcelain with Crystalline Glaze

Matt Horne - MHO006

Claret Long Necked Vase

Porcelain with Crystalline Glaze

Matt Horne - MHO005

Claret Long Necked Vase

Porcelain with Crystalline Glaze

MAtt Horne - MHO007

Green Cylinder Vase

Porcelain with Crystalline Glaze

Matt Horne - MHO008

Green Fluted Vase

Porcelain with Crystalline Glaze



There is a fabulous video of Matt showing how he finished the base of his beautiful pots


Crystalline Glazing

“Crystalline glazing is time consuming & expensive to produce. There can be many failures, but when all goes well the effects are stunning.

All of my pots are hand thrown in porcelain, one of the more difficult clays to throw, especially large pots. Crystalline glaze is mixed using a variety of ingredients, some measured in minute amounts. It is applied very thick, up to 4mm to encourage the glaze to run. 

The pot is then placed on a pedestal and stands in a dish, to catch the runoff during the firing. When the kiln reaches the maximum temperature (up to 1300c). It is then rapidly cooled to a specific holding temperature. This is the time when the crystals form in the glaze. The amount of time held at this temperature contributes to the size of the crystals, which occur randomly,  making each pot unique.

When all has cooled down, there is the delicate operation of removing the pot from the pedestal and grinding the bottom smooth.”